Identifying and analyzing emerging trends in campaigns and elections.

Archive for February 1st, 2012|Daily archive page

Bonamici Wins Convincingly In Oregon’s 1st District

In House, Presidential campaign on February 1, 2012 at 12:49 pm

Former State Senator Suzanne Bonamici (D) racked up a 54-39 percent victory over GOP businessman Rob Cornilles in Oregon’s 1st District special election contest to fill the unexpired term of resigned Rep. David Wu (D). The outcome was no surprise in a district that has been reliably Democratic since Les AuCoin became the first member of his party to carry the seat all the way back in the Watergate year of 1974.

Bonamici, elected to the state House of Representatives in 2006 and then appointed to the state Senate before the end of her first term, can expect clear sailing throughout the rest of the decade. She ran at virtually the same level as former Rep. David Wu (D) in his last election during 2010. In that most Republican of years, a scandal-tainted Wu defeated Cornilles 55-42 percent.

Ms. Bonamici will be immediately sworn into the House later this week. OR-1 now leaves the open seat list and returns to the D incumbent column. The new congresswoman is already a heavy favorite to win a full term in the new 1st District in the regular election.

Indiana’s Rep. Burton to Retire

In House on February 1, 2012 at 12:01 pm

Rep. Dan Burton (R), a 15-term congressman, announced that he will not seek re-election later this year, thus avoiding a difficult primary contest that he was not guaranteed of winning. Mr. Burton won his last two primaries with small pluralities of the vote and would have had serious trouble had Indiana employed a run-off electoral system.

Former Rep. David McIntosh (D-IN-2), who left the House in 2000 to run unsuccessfully as the Republican gubernatorial nominee, already is in the race. And former US Attorney Susan Brooks is an announced candidate, as is ex-Marion County Coroner John McGoff, who is making his third run for the seat. The eventual Republican nominee will be the heavy favorite to win in November. The Indiana primary is May 8. Candidate filing closes Feb. 21.

Mr. Burton becomes the 33rd member to announce he won’t seek re-election to the House (19D-14R). Eighteen members are opting to retire from politics, while 15 are running for a different office. Adding the new seats created by reapportionment and redistricting, 49 seats are already open for the 2012 election.

Inside Romney’s Big Victory In Florida, and What’s Next

In Election Analysis, Presidential campaign on February 1, 2012 at 11:48 am

Former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney racked up a major victory in the Florida primary last night, scoring close to an outright majority of the Republican vote for the first time in the nomination contest. Romney garnered 46 percent of the vote to former House Speaker Newt Gingrich’s 32 percent. Former Pennsylvania Sen. Rick Santorum followed with 13 percent. Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX-14) registered only 7 percent of the vote.

Romney carried the day largely in South Florida as he topped 61 percent of the vote in Miami-Dade, clearly his best county. He also notched majority percentages in Broward, Palm Beach, Collier, Martin, and Indian River counties, all coastal regions in the central and southern parts of the state.

Gingrich, Santorum, and Paul came nowhere near making this a race. Since none of them met the benchmarks they had each hoped to achieve in Florida, where does the campaign go from here?

Even with the sweep of Florida’s 50 delegates – down 50 percent because of the penalty absorbed for moving its primary before Super Tuesday – Romney only leads the overall delegate count 65-27 over Gingrich, with only approximately 5 percent of the total number of delegates apportioned. With so many more states to vote, where is the next likely place for Gingrich to make a move, assuming that both Santorum and Paul are now too far behind the momentum curve to make a resurgent thrust?

The next states on the calendar favor Romney. The Nevada, Minnesota and Colorado caucuses are next up, followed by the Michigan and Arizona primaries. With the Gingrich campaign so far displaying a lack of organizational ability, the caucus format will again likely favor Romney. Michigan, a state that elected his father governor in the 60s, also has proven to be a strong state for the current front runner. Arizona might be a place for an upset, but the immigration issue, one upon which Gingrich is less conservative, could be a sticking point. If Romney rolls through the aforementioned states, will he clinch the nomination before Super Tuesday? Practically, yes, but it is unlikely the competition will cease.

By all accounts, the Florida result is a big victory for Mitt Romney, and may prove to be close to a knock-out blow.